Squoosh is an online image optimization tool from Google Chrome Labs
Techsense

Squoosh is an online image optimization tool from Google Chrome Labs

Google Chrome Labs has introduced a new image optimization tool called Squoosh. This open-source utility lets you compress or downsize images without losing too much in terms of quality. This should come in handy for web developers and online publishers, especially with respect to page loading times.

Squoosh is an online image optimization tool from Google Chrome Labs

Squoosh was briefly shown off at the ongoing Chrome Dev Summit, and is the latest in Google’s efforts to make web browsing faster and more user friendly than ever before. With the size of web pages increasing progressively over the last few years, page load times have increased too. This can often become an issue for users on slower connections, especially on mobile. While mobile themes have been a thing for a while now, they are not enough. To this end, Google announced Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) to reduce page loading times drastically.

Coming back to Squoosh, this web app uses a programming language called WebAssembly that allows it to use more efficient codecs that are generally not available in browsers. At the moment, the app offers options like MozJPEG, Webp, OptiPNG and others for users to play with.

Squoosh is an online image optimization tool from Google Chrome Labs

Using Squoosh is pretty easy. Head over to Squoosh.app, upload an image and check out the options on the right side, like Resize, Reduce Palette, Compress and Quality. You can also view a 1:1 comparison of the original image and the optimized image, giving you an instant idea about how those options have changed your file.

Squoosh can also be used offline, and the best part is that you don’t have to download any extension. Once you load the website, it is cached and you can continue to use it even when there is no internet connection.

Squoosh can be used on all browsers, but as is the case with many Google offerings, it works best in Chrome. You can also head over to Github if you’re interested in checking out its source code.

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